12 Russian Intel officials indicted for allegedly hacking Clinton campaign, DNC emails: What to know - World Truth

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Friday, July 13, 2018

12 Russian Intel officials indicted for allegedly hacking Clinton campaign, DNC emails: What to know

The 11-count indictment detailed the coordinated effort to break into key Democratic email accounts, including those belonging to the Democratic National Committee, the Clinton campaign and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Rosenstein said the suspects “worked to hack into computers, steal documents, and release those documents with the intent to interfere with the election.”

The indictment stated the 12 Russian officials “knowingly and intentionally conspired with each other, and with persons known and unknown to the Grand Jury to gain unauthorized access [to ‘hack’] into the computers of U.S. persons and entities involved in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, steal documents from those computers and stage releases of the stolen documents to interfere with the 2016 U.S. presidential election.”

By March 2016, the group started to hack members of the Clinton campaign, including the email account of her campaign chairman, John Podesta, according to the indictment. The next month, the hackers infiltrated the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s network. By around June 2016, the conspirators “released tens of thousands of the stolen emails and documents.”

The indictment noted the conspirators “did so using fictitious" personalities online "including ‘DCLeaks’ and ‘Guccifer 2.0.’” The document also noted the conspirators “continued their U.S. election-interference operations through in or around November 2016." The conspirators hid their connections to the Kremlin by using fake identities.

What charges do they face?

The indictment laid out 11 criminal charges; including conspiracy, identity theft and money laundering.

Two defendants were charged with “separate conspiracy to access computers without authorization, and to cause damage to those computers, in connection with efforts to infiltrate computers used to conduct elections,” Rosenstein said.

Eleven defendants were charged with “conspiring to access computers without authorization, and to cause damage to those computers, in connection with efforts to steal documents and release them in order to interfere with the election,” the deputy attorney general said.

Before Friday, 20 people and three companies had been charged in the Mueller investigation. They include four former Trump campaign and White House aides, three of whom have pleaded guilty to different crimes and agreed to cooperate, as well as 13 Russians accused of participating in a powerful social media campaign to sway American public opinion in the 2016 election.

Fox News’ Alex Pappas and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com. You can follow her at @Kathleen_Joyce8 on Twitter.